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Study Sometimes, when describing clinical information systems, such as the electronic health record, it is helpful to describe their respective inputs and outputs. The use of a controlled vocabulary is required in order to ensure interoperability, so that the information entered into an electronic medical record can be transmitted between health information systems. Examine the case study on pages 35-36 of your Health Informatics: A Systems Perspective textbook’s Chapter 2 and respond to the questions that follow:

Determine the nature of the problem that needs to be addressed.

Make a suggestion for a solution to the problem. What makes you believe your proposed solution is the best option?

Identify and describe the national or international standards that you would incorporate into your solution as a component of your solution.

In Carol’s opinion, what is the significance of interoperability is important to explain.

In addition to the title and reference pages, the paper must be one to two double-spaced double-spaced pages long, and it must be formatted in accordance with APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.

It is necessary to include a title page that contains the following information:

The title of the paper

Name of the student

The name and number of the course

The name of the instructor

Date on which the submission was made

Use at least two scholarly sources, excluding the textbook, in your paper.

It is necessary to begin with an introductory paragraph and end with a concluding paragraph.

THE CASE STUDY IS CONTAINED BELOW.

THE PAGES 35 AND 36 OF CHAPTER 2

A Concern Regarding Display Codes

Timothy B. Patrick is an American businessman and author.

It is discovered during the course of an EMR implementation project at a large medical center that the question of how to design display screens for the system is of critical importance. The specific concern is with the standard codes that should be used for the information displayed on the user interface screens. One of the members of the health informatics group has responded to the following e-mail, which is a request for consultation from an IT staff member who is involved in the EMR project:

Carol,

I require your assistance with something, and it is a very important thing to me. What I’m wondering is if you or anyone on your team would be interested in taking on this project as a side job.

I’m currently engaged in the development of a new EMR project. One of the things we’re stuck on right now is the standardization of information displays in the electronic medical record. Because the record is integrated (which is both a good and a bad thing), the majority of the tables and code sets are shared by multiple disciplines, which is both a good and a bad thing. We must first decide on the materials that will be used for our displays. For example, the code set we’re currently working on is Units of Measure, which stands for Units of Measure. Now, you might not think it would be too difficult to figure out what the display for something like â€milligrams†would be like, would you? Except that the options are MG, Mg, mg, and so onâ€â€. And thatâ€TMs one of the straightforward ones.

According to the standard abbreviations used by the medical center, all of the examples above are perfectly acceptable. The problem is that, in order to construct the EMR, we must choose just one. So far, since we began implementing the EMR, we’ve used a jumble of different displays, depending on which department we were collaborating with at the time. As a result, we’ve gotten ourselves into a real jam, and our database is a complete mess. It is possible to only have one abbreviation displayed for milligrams in a truly integrated EMR system.

Please keep in mind that this is only one example out of literally hundreds (if not thousands) of pieces of information that we need to standardize.

Do you have any free time to assist us in determining what standards are currently in use? What we’d like to do is establish a standard that is widely accepted throughout the country, if not the world. This document must contain standards, definitions, and abbreviations for pharmacy, medicine, nursing, and purchasing units, among other things. For the EMR Steering Committee and the Medical Records Committee to consider, we would like to have some standards in place that we can present to them.

Do you have any ideas or recommendations? If you’d like, I’d be delighted to meet with you and discuss the matter further. Thanks.

Michael


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