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Please respond to at least two of your classmates’ posts. Use at least three of these prompts to ensure that your responses are substantive:

Comment on the peer-reviewed article chosen by your peers.

Discuss how the key concepts presented by your colleagues can be applied in your workplace. (I work in an Emergency Room)

Provide new references to back up your claims.

Please include citations and references in APA format to back up your thoughts and opinions. Estimated completion time: 2 hours

The first peer to respond-

Burt Tiara

ABOUT THEORY AND EDUCATIONAL Burt Tiara

Excellent Form

Theory and Education in Nursing

In order for nursing to progress, theory, practice, and research must all be integrated. Self-care, self-care deficit, and nursing systems are the three conceptual frameworks that comprise Orem’s Self Care Nursing Theory. (Dumas, 1993) Clinical staff in acute care settings can benefit from Orem’s theory. In nursing, we use this theory to develop diagnoses, care plans, interventions, goals, and outcomes. This theory serves as a framework for critical thinking in clinical nursing. The presence of such a theory allows for education by teaching patients and family members how to care for themselves or their loved ones. It aids in the reduction of self-care deficits. Because of this theory and research, patients and families are able to retain the knowledge that we as nurses are able to teach them. This article explains how family members can influence a client’s healing. When they return home, a holistic vision of the family should be assessed to determine the actual ongoing process of healing.

Curriculum for Nursing

Nursing curricula are now based on the Tyler Curriculum Development model, which was developed in 1949. This model has been adopted as the primary model in nursing curricula. McEwen and Wills (2014) This model assists future nurses in gaining a better understanding of the value of education and its impact on nursing. It assists nurses in determining what to apply to their nursing practice and why.

Personal Recollections

This theory, I believe, will assist nurses in becoming better educators for their patients. For example, I had a patient who had recently been diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus and had to be hospitalized as a result of it. We had to thoroughly assess his self-care after he arrived at the rehab center in order to properly discharge him back home. We had to watch him perform glucose sticks, read blood sugar levels, and adjust his insulin dosage accordingly. Because he had mild cognitive deficits, I needed to ensure that family members were involved and analyzed in order to promote a continuum of care. Diabetes education had to be provided not only to the patient but also to the patient’s family. Orem’s theory ensures that patients’ self-care needs are met even after they are no longer in our care.

References

McEwen, M., and E. Wills (2014). Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Theoretical Basis for Nursing (4th Edition).

L. Dumas (1993, Nov). Evaluation of Orem’s Family Pub Med: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8261376

Responding to a Second Peer –

Montenegro, Niurka

ABOUT THEORY AND EDUCATIONAL

Collapse

Excellent Form

The inclusion of nursing theories in nurse education is still one of the most important issues being advocated for in the nursing community (McEwen &Willis, 2014). Specifically, nurse educators face the challenge of incorporating nursing theories into all levels of curricula. Dyess, Boykin, and Connie (2010), for example, present an article that investigates the integration of a nursing theory with practice and education. The caring theory is the nursing model that has been used. According to the authors, theory-based nursing has the potential to improve outcomes in healthcare settings. The Watson caring theory upholds the art of loving kindness and the genuine presence of nurses in a patient’s life. It also confirms religion’s spiritual role in patients’ well-being. Dyes, Boykin, and Connie (2010) apply the theory to create a project that highlights the impact of a caring theory-based education unit.

Nursing theory clearly has an advantage in nursing education. First, it lays out the principles that serve as a framework for nurses’ practice. In my professional experience, for example, the Watson caring theory influences my patient care. I am open to different spiritual perspectives. I understand if an employee prefers not to shave before being fitted for a respirator due to religious beliefs, while also emphasizing the importance of protecting against airborne exposures. Second, it aids in the generation of additional nursing knowledge. Furthermore, it helps nurses understand their purpose and role in the healthcare facility.

As a result, there are several key considerations that nurse educators must take into account when developing curricula. The first consideration is curriculum design. Nurse educators must make certain that the design incorporates nursing theories into practice. In essence, it must provide a framework for both theoretical and practical teachings. It must allow for gaps that arise during the practice process. Furthermore, the curricula must be comprehensive, specific, and tailored to the level of learning, as well as capable of translating theoretical issues into practice. Finally, nursing educators must follow the guidelines established by regulatory bodies when developing curriculum. For example, the curriculum for students must be developed in accordance with the course content defined by NCSBN or another regulatory agency. As a result, incorporating nursing theory into nurse education is critical.

References

Susan Dyess, Anne Boykin, and Connie Rigg (2010). Integrating caring theory into nursing practice and education: Getting to the heart of the matter DOI 10.1097/NNA.0b013e3181f88b96. Journal of Nursing Administration, 40, pp. 498-503.

McEwen, M., and E. Wills (2014). Nursing’s Theoretical Foundation (4th Ed.). Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia, PA

Integrating Caring Theory With Nursing Practice and Education: Connecting With What Matters.pdf Ovid (297.494 KB)


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